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Parish Association of Bütgenbach

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Resurrection office for Mr. Ewald Linden
Spouse of Ursula Hommes
Butgenbach, February 24, 2011

reading: Prayer to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Sacred Heart of Jesus, source of all good things, I adore you, I believe in you, I hope in you, I love you and repent of all my sins. I give you this poor heart of mine, make it humble, patient, pure and in everything according to your wishes. Grant, O good Jesus, that I live in you and you in me. Protect me in dangers, comfort me in tribulations and afflictions. Grant me health of soul and body, Your blessings on all my works, and the grace of a blessed death. Amen.

Gospel: John 14.1-6
1 Do not let your heart be confused. Believe in God and believe in me!
2 There are many apartments in my father's house, if it weren't for that, I would have told you, I'm going to prepare a place for you?
3 When I have gone and have prepared a place for you, I will come back and bring you to me so that you can also be where I am.
4 And where I'm going - you know the way there.
5 Thomas said to him: Lord, we don't know where you are going. Then how should we know the way?

introduction
Saying: “You have to go the last way alone, without help, without my hand. But the Lord God will stand by the way and lead you into his heavenly land. "

What does a little child do when they fall? It reaches out its hands and waits for someone to take it by the hand and help it up. This is an ancient human gesture. There are situations in our lives where we are helpless ourselves, where we need someone to take us by the hand and guide us.
It is easy for people in their prime to forget that. In the years of his illness and need of care you have seen again and again that your husband, your father stretched out his hands to you and you helped him: in bed and out of bed, led him.
This life came to an end surprisingly quickly on Sunday morning.
EWALD was led the way that we humans do not want to go: the way to death. We shy away from this path; he scares us. And so we stretch out our hands for help today - towards God. That he takes us by the hand and leads our hope beyond death. "Follow me", Jesus invites Peter on the path that he does not know. Follow me on the path through death into life, Jesus also says today to our deceased.
We can believe that Christ took his hand when he died and led him from this earthly life into eternal life.


Speech:

Dear Ursula, dear family Linden,

Your husband, your father, died on Sunday morning in the hands of your mother Ursula.
“You have to go the last way alone, without help, without my hand. But the Lord God will stand by the way and lead you into his heavenly land. "
 
“If only I were with my mother,” he said several times recently. His mother Anna died 11 years ago at the age of almost 92. His father died at the age of 59.

"He is now redeemed, he is happy now," you said to Ursula a few hours after his death. Yes, Ewald was sick for 25 years. It started with back pain at the age of 41, followed by breathing problems. Most recently in 2009 he had to be operated three times within 20 days, was in the intensive care unit in Malmedy for almost 50 days, then came to the Liège university clinic.

How happy you were that he was able to come home again and he was lovingly cared for, he was completely dependent on your help. "I do a lot of work for you," he said to you. But you were happy to do it, just as you promised back then, on August 30, 1968, 43 years ago, when you got married: "in joy and in sorrow".

Ewald was a person who prayed: he never forgot the prayers. We have just heard one of them, which he spoke every day: to the heart of Jesus. But he also had a close relationship with Mother Mary, especially with the Virgin of the Poor of Banneux. The mother-of-God song “Bless you Maria” could not be missing either, which he liked to sing at home with Ursula as long as he could. The statue of Our Lady, which always shone at night, was never missing where he was. Even during his hospital stays, he always wanted to have her with him. Every day he prayed for a happy hour of death, which - despite his suffering - was given to him last Sunday morning.

He would have liked to take part in the church service, but his state of health did not allow him to do so. He received St. Communion, which he broke to give the other half to his wife.

Many of us got to know Ewald as a simple, content person who was far from complaining. He had accepted his long illness: “I have to take it as it is,” he often said. Nevertheless, he always kept his hope: "I would like to go home again," he said in the hospital. As a “machinist” and “trucker”, his passion was engines and tractors. He was determined to be able to drive again one day.

“You have to go the last way alone, without help, without my hand. But the Lord God will stand by the way and lead you into his heavenly land. "

Outstretched hands say: I depend on others, I need help, I need someone to take my hand and tell me: I'll hold you tight, I'm with you, I'll guide you.
Not only sick people have to learn this, however. Nobody can just clench their hands together, nobody can just grab hold of a lifetime, everyone has to stretch out their hands at some point and say: I accept the limits of my strength, my ability; I am ready to entrust myself to someone who will take me by the hand and lift me up, who may lead me on paths that I cannot or do not trust myself to walk.
Outstretched hands also mean: "Everything is yours, O God."
Belief in the resurrection is an offer, an invitation from God to us, not a compulsion, but a hand stretched out towards us: we can seize it, entrust our lives to him. We can say to him: Everything is yours, O God - my questions, my hope, my longing, my suffering, my faith, my life.
If we stretch out our hand, then we are not reaching into emptiness, and if we take his hand, God will tell us: You will not belong to death, you will be mine.

I take you by the hand and guide you. "So take my hands and guide me", so it is said in a song, a little tapped because it is so often used for weddings. But in reality it is a death song, because only God and no human can ultimately fulfill what is there It is hoped and expected: "So take my hands and lead me to my blissful end and for ever. I cannot go alone, not one step. Wherever you will go and stand, take me with you."

Resurrection office for Mr. Josef Ohles
Spouse of Agnes Brüls
Bütgenbach, March 01, 2011

Gospel: John 12: 24-26
A grain of wheat that does not go underground and dies cannot bear fruit, but it remains for itself. But in the earth it sprouts and bears a lot of fruit, although it itself dies in the process. 25 Whoever wants to keep his life for himself will lose his life. But if you let go of your life and use it for God, you will win real life forever. 26 Whoever wants to serve me must follow me on my way. And where I am, those who have served me will also be. They will all be crowned with honor and glory by my father. "

Dear Agnes, dear family of Josef,

At noon on Friday, a three-week ordeal came to an end for Josef and you. On February 4th, our deceased was admitted to Malmedyer Hospital, had three operations within three days and was in an artificial coma. A time of fear and hope, if he succeeds, he will get better. But it soon became clear that Josef would no longer get well, the intestinal infarction he had suffered was too bad, so suddenly, unsuspecting.

Josef was born almost 73 years ago, on March 26, 1938, as the youngest of ten children of the married couple Johann Ohles and Margarethe Messerich in Rodt. He never broke off his roots in his home village, as he always enjoyed attending the meetings of his class.

His mother died very early in 1950. Josef was 12 years old at the time. After elementary school he began a three-year shoemaker apprenticeship in St. Vith. He should never practice the shoemaker's trade as a profession. At the age of 18 he found a job as a professional military man in the Elsenborn camp, where he worked as a plumber, roofer and plumber until his retirement in 1987.

With that began, Josef was 50 years old, a new phase of life, where he could devote himself entirely to his flowers, his flower garden. How could he enjoy the flowers, blooming flowers. Today we can say that Eternal Life is blooming for him.
When he planted flowers, the story of the grain of wheat falling into the dark earth, dissolving, dying, and only then can the fruit grow.
"If the grain of wheat does not fall into the ground and die, it remains alone, but if it dies, it bears abundant fruit." Yes, what counts for Christ is not what we have, but what we have given, the traces of love, the dedication we have left.
We know the role of flowers in nature. Everyone wants to bloom once. For this she sacrifices her beauty to awaken new life. Everything that a person has done out of faith and love connects him with God. These are the flowers of life that don't wither. They bloom into eternity.

But not only the flowers were his passion, his heart was also on the breeding of small animals. For forty years he was a member of the small animal breeding association Weywertz and the surrounding area. After he ran out of rabbits himself, he set up a small zoo of animals in plaster figures, woe betide them if they weren't in the right place in the garden. Finally, on Palm Sunday, I was looking for a rooster that crows at a family and children's church service. It wasn't long before Josef was standing in front of my door and presented him to me.

I got to know Joseph as a deeply religious person who had not always come to terms with the innovations of the faith and who knew that he was very connected to tradition.

And yet he was an open person who liked to take part in the life of the parish, so in recent years his whole enthusiasm has been for the “living advent calendar”. How happy and proud he was when he could design a window for Advent himself, which he built with great attention to detail. Josef was only rarely absent from the other 22 Advent windows, as he consciously wanted to experience Advent as a time that is not only dedicated to consumption, but above all should serve as a preparation for the incarnation of God.

He also showed great interest in local history, because he was very well read in it, was interested in local history and in many war experiences.

He lived rather withdrawn, celebrating was not his thing. Nevertheless, he was looking forward to a festival to be celebrated on June 17th. Because it was the 50th anniversary of your wedding in 1961 in the Bütgenbach parish church.

Josef left traces (see Spruch Zeitung) in his life. The following story occurred to me:
A man had a dream. He dreamed that he was walking along the beach with Jesus. Scenes from his life appeared in the sky, and for each scene there were traces in the sand: one belonged to him, the other to the Lord. As he looked back at the footprints in the sand, he noticed that sometimes there was only one, especially during the times when he was worst. He was amazed at this and asked Jesus why he had left him alone in times of need.
The Lord replied: My dear, dear friend. I love you and I would never leave you. During the times when you were the worst and you suffered - where you can only see a footprint: In that time I carried you.

Dear Agnes,

The story you hear presupposes a tremendous belief: someone is going with you! But haven't you already experienced that in your marriage? When the stole was put around your hands 50 years ago, God also promised in Jesus: I will go with you in good and bad days. How many have already experienced this and say: Without God's help, I would not have made it through it!

Ash Wednesday is in a few days. Ashes are scattered over our heads with the admonishing word: Remember, man, that you are dust and will return to the dust again. What we anticipated in the sign on Ash Wednesday, we have to exist and accept as reality today: the death of a loved one, the transfer of his mortal shell into the earth, the experience that our life passes and nothing remains.

We humans do not create anything lasting, nothing for eternity. God alone is permanent and final. Joseph had this faith and the grace to be able to trust this God. Amen.

Resurrection office for Mrs. Bernadette Fickers-Margraff
Marcel Fickers' wife
Weywertz, March 02, 2011

Saying: "Your heart was too good for this world"
Gospel:
25Therefore I say to you, do not be anxious about your livelihood, about food, drink and clothing. Life is more than just eating and drinking, and people are more important than their clothes. 26 Look at the birds! They do not sow anything, they do not reap or collect supplies. Your Heavenly Father takes care of them. Don't you think he cares much more about you than about birds? 27And no matter how much you worry, there is nothing you can add to your height.
28Why are you so worried about your clothes? Look at the flowers in the meadows! They don't work and they don't care about their clothes. 29And yet, not even King Solomon in all his glory was dressed as splendidly as any of them. 30If God even makes the meadow flowers grow so beautifully, which are blooming today and may already be withered tomorrow, don't you think that He will take care of you even more? Do you trust God so little?
So stop worrying about questions like, 'Will we have enough to eat? And what are we going to drink? What should we wear? ’Your Heavenly Father knows you need all of these. 33 Above all, worry about God's new world and live according to God's will. Then he will give you everything you need to live. So don't be afraid of the future! Tomorrow will bring its own questions and burdens and God will take care of you tomorrow too. "

Dear Marcel, Ronny and Sammy, dear family of Bernadette, dear relatives, friends and neighbors,

During the preparation of this farewell service, Marcel, you told me, please tell people to open your door, the door of your heart, not just a crack, but very wide, open up, talk about yourself, your fears and worries and If necessary, seek professional help if it no longer works.

Because many people suffer, in silence, in the silence of their hearts, can express themselves, talk about how Bernadette did it to you, Marcel, but maybe not enough: That's why the door of your heart is open, wide open, just as well the place in the deepest part of your soul.

That is your message, perhaps also from Bernadette, to us this morning. Your death should be a help for others, you told me and in the deep grief in which you, dear relatives and we all live, be a spark to recognize the message so that we can live on, live differently.

It is a problem of our industrial society, our performance society, that we always have to be in top shape, to achieve something, to achieve something, to be exposed to pressure to perform that is imposed on us from outside or that we make ourselves. Who doesn't experience that from us? The fear of failure, the fear of not being up to the many challenges in life.

A person who puts an end to his life is a taboo subject, you don't talk about it, you can't talk about it and that's why I am also aware of my words, which can easily be misunderstood, depending on who hears them and how you use them hears. But it wouldn't be honest not to talk about it. One or the other of us has already thought about it when he was down, no longer knew what to do and said: "Now I would like to be gone, to be dead, what is the point of all this?"

It is not up to anyone to judge it. We are not allowed to evaluate someone else's suffering or distress, not even with empty phrases that only express our embarrassment, such as saying: "She had a good life, had a family and a job." say nothing, start with ourselves.

When it affects others, we quickly have explanations at hand; But how quickly it can hit us, our own families, with all the suffering that is connected with tearing us into a deep hole, thwarting all life plans at once ... especially when we have to face problems that cannot be solved are or we do not see success in our actions. Especially people who deal with people who work in social professions, who constantly deal with the suffering or worries of others or who find it difficult to separate the private from the professional. How difficult it is to separate this in order not to perish from experiencing a burnout that pulls you down deep.

There are many people among us who have a rough shell, but a soft heart, to which it is sometimes difficult to penetrate.
But there are also people, like Bernadette, who have a very sensitive heart, a soft heart that is too good for our world, in a world where things get tough.

"Your heart was too good for this world", we could read this sentence in the obituary on Monday. "Your heart was too good for this world". Bernadette was not only very sensitive in terms of feeling, but also in terms of her core, her nature.

"Her heart was so filled with love that she wanted to give it away for others", initially for you as a family, but also beyond, e.g. B. at her workplace in the Weismes senior citizens' home, where she had an intimate relationship with the old, sick people who were like children to her, who she cared about, sat by her bed, petted her, held her hand in order to feel her to let that they are valuable, that they are not written off in our amusement society of youth madness. How much she must have listened to her worries, suffered, mourned with them.

People like Bernadette, who have such a good heart, too good for this world, see the things we don't see, who pay attention to things we don't have an eye for.

People who want to be there for others and who put themselves behind, who are not the focus and quietly go about their work to make others happy.

People who can gush with joie de vivre in happy hours, but then fall just as deeply when they experience suffering, ask themselves existential questions and do not, like others on the surface, live senselessly into the day. We live in a fun society in which everyone always has to be in a good mood. That life can also be a burden, sometimes even an overwhelming burden, is ignored. That there is also this side of life is felt especially by those people who have kept a sensitive, good heart. Who do not easily and superficially pass over everything that is kHave grown a thick skin from which problems do not simply roll off like raindrops on a freshly polished body.

People who grapple with questions about the future, whether in their own family or while reading the newspaper, ask themselves how our world should go on in the face of misery, where suffering never ends, where we love to be there for everyone wants, but then has to become aware of his own limitations as “little people” and cannot save the whole world.

And people who, like Bernadette, ask themselves, where is the Lord God? How can he allow the suffering, why does he not intervene. Do you have god the world, have you forgotten me?

Dear family,

We are all deeply affected by Bernadette's death. There is so much darkness over this hour; and I know that many who are here now feel the same way. Why? This question does not let us go. Why? - a probing question and I just want to leave the big question mark behind it. The answer to these questions remains in the dark.

The Gospel that we have just heard and that was proclaimed in all churches on the day of their death last WE does not mean those who live like flower children into the day - on the contrary. It means the people who are trying to consciously work on a new world. The Bible calls this new world the "Kingdom of God", which is primarily concerned with the Kingdom of God.

Those who consciously live their day with God, pause before him, come to rest, will be given serenity, one would think. Whoever tries to meet his fellow human beings openly, has an ear for them, consciously perceives the other with his eyes, will find out that a lot comes back in terms of attention, trust and respect.

"You must first be concerned with his kingdom." Where is this kingdom, the new world, to be found today. Bernadette tried to work on this new world among us and at the same time suffered from how far we are from this new world of God are removed.
 
But she tried to sow a little mustard seed over and over again. We can believe that and that we will not forget the Lord God her.

Resurrection office for Mr. Peter Willems
Maria Schumacher's spouse
Weywertz, March 21, 2011

Saying: "Thousands of thanks be from my heart to him who still thinks of me in the grave and from his pious heart gives me a father ours."

reading: Rom 10,8b-13
8Whoever believes in Christ knows: “God is very near to me in his word; it is in my mouth and in my heart. ”By this word of scripture is meant the faith in Christ whom we proclaim.
9For if you confess with your mouth, "Jesus Christ is Lord!" And if you believe with all your heart that God raised him from the dead, then you will be saved. 10Whoever believes in Christ with all his heart and also confesses this faith before men will be accepted by God and find salvation. 11So the prophet Isaiah says: "Whoever really believes and puts his trust in him will not be lost. ”12There is no difference between Jews and Gentiles: God is one and the same Lord who gives gifts from his abundance to all who ask him. 13Therefore it is also said: "All who profess the Lord and call on his name are to be saved.“

Gospel: Lk 2,22-32
22Forty days after he was born, the time of “purification” as prescribed by Moses in the law was over. So Joseph and Mary brought the child to Jerusalem to consecrate it to God. 23 The law expressly states: “Every first son of the family and every firstborn male animal should belong to the Lord.” 24They also made the prescribed cleansing offering: two lovebirds or two other pigeons had to be sacrificed.
25A man named Simeon lived in Jerusalem at that time. He lived the commandments of God conscientiously and waited longingly for the coming of the Messiah. Simeon was filled with the Holy Spirit. 26Through him he knew that he would not die until he saw Christ the Savior with his own eyes. 27 Urged by the Holy Spirit, he went to the temple that day. When Mary and Joseph brought the child in to consecrate them to God, 28 Simeon took them in his arms and praised God:
29 “Lord, you kept your word, now I can die in peace.
30/31 I saw it with my own eyes:
You have sent us the Savior and everyone will know.
32He is the light of all peoples, and he will be the glory of your people Israel. "

 

Dear family of Peter,

"Now you, Lord, let your servant part in peace, as you have said" - so the aged Simeon prays as he holds the newborn baby Jesus in his hands and recognizes in him the Messiah. Simeon stands on the threshold of death, At a blessed old age, at the end of a long life. He has long since left his life's work and life's work behind him; now - it is said - he is waiting for the salvation of Israel and for the privilege of seeing this promised Savior in person, now when he is him in the shape of the baby Jesus holds in his hands, he can die in peace.

Dear family Willems " Your late husband, your father, father-in-law and grandpa seem to me to be cut from the face of this Simeon from the Bible. He died on Thursday lunchtime at the old age of almost 89. His life force was simply used up, and so he fell asleep peacefully at home at his family. It's a blessing. He saw death itself coming. On March 8th he asked you to call me to give him the anointing of the sick, to give him communion. That is to be compared with the sentence of old Simeon: "Now you, Lord, let your servant part in peace, as you said." After a long life, filled with a deep faith in God Peter gave his life back into the hands of God on Thursday.

This life began on May 23, 1922 as the second of six children of the married couple Johann Willems and Maria Boemer in Weywertz. He was a master blacksmith in the fifth generation. He learned the craft of blacksmithing from his father. He worked in the family business for sixty years, 50 of which as a self-employed master blacksmith, in a profession that is becoming increasingly rare and which he enjoyed with great pleasure until his retirement in 1987. People came from near and far to have their horses shod with him.

As a 19-year-old he was drafted in October 1941. But because of an eye problem, he didn't have to go to war right away. So he helped in his father's forge, but had to make himself available for the war. The draft order was issued in March 1944, and Peter came back to the Siegfried Line via France and Poland, where he had to take part in the Rundstedt Offensive. Shortly before Christmas 1944, he was captured by the Americans in Bastogne. The joy was great when he was allowed to see home again on November 25, 1945 after his imprisonment. The devastating World War, however, cost two of his brothers their lives.

Our deceased had always been a blacksmith throughout his life. When horses were increasingly being replaced by tractors in the 1960s, he had to look around for extra income and therefore ran a small farm from 1967 to 1982. For over 60 years he was in the blacksmiths professional guild and was one of its honorary members.
Up until a few years ago, his blacksmith's workshop was an important meeting place in the village. Even from grandfather's time, he knew to report that the blacksmith's workshop was repeatedly visited by many people who told each other the latest news. He had always remained true to the motto of the blacksmiths: "What you inherit from your fathers, acquire it in order to own it!"

Just as the horseshoe has two ends, so were two things that determined the life of our deceased: praying and working.
Peter was characterized by a simple and frugal way of life and hard, diligent work. Despite - or should I say: precisely because of - this simple life was he a heartily satisfied and happy person.
With his down-to-earth way of life, he has given you, his children, a good role model for a start in life and at the same time taught you how valuable family cohesion is.
A long, beautiful evening of life: together with you, with Maria with whom two years ago - on May 18, 1949 in the chapel of Champagne - he was even able to celebrate the diamond wedding, i.e. the 60th wedding anniversary.

This full life came to an end on Thursday. Full of life and blessed by God like the aged Simeon from the Gospel.

The evangelist Luke writes of this Simeon: "He was righteous and pious and waited for the salvation of Israel." In this too, I believe, your deceased husband and father resembles his biblical example. Faith has shaped his life, and he has this faith When it came to his Lord God, he didn't like lazy compromises.

The Bible says of the aged Simeon: "It was revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death until he saw the Lord's Messiah." That is probably not to be understood as if this certainty was with him with one Once there, as if he had fallen from heaven. He must have had to pray his way into it for a long time until he had this conviction that he would see what he was hoping for. This certainty of being able to see what he was doing face to face for once believes has also met our deceased.

And so Peter set off. His path has come to an end. In his farewell hour he could say: "Now, Lord, let your servants part in peace." He has now come to God. We can be sure that he has light and salvation and fulfillment ready for her.

Resurrection office for Mrs. Anna Gennen
---
Bütgenbach, March 23, 2011 (retirement home)


Dear Anna's family, dear fellow Christians,

On March 19, the feast day of St. Josef, Mrs. Anna Gennen went home in peace - comforted and accompanied by her relatives. Death was - at the age of 95 - not a slump, but more like the evening after a long, fulfilling day. Your life arc, your powers have come to the natural end.

It was only a few weeks ago, on January 11th, when you, dear family, said goodbye to your sister Lisa, who was also unmarried, who died in the St. Vither retirement home and was buried in St. Vith, just like Anna, completely is buried near her.

Anna's life began on February 26, 1917 in Braunlauf, at a time when our homeland was still part of the German Empire. Her parents Jonas Gennen and Clara Ilten gave birth to a total of nine children, of which one of our deceased's sister still lives.

She spent her childhood and youth on her parents' farm, where she primarily did field work. At the age of 20 Anna took up a position, first to Malmedy, then to Stavelot, worked in various places in the horeca sector and came to Liège in the mid-fifties of the last century, where she worked as a housekeeper and finally after Death of the owner remained in the house, which she then opened for many students, including quite a few from our area.
She stayed in Liège until the end of 2000, when, due to her frailty, she wanted to stay in a retirement home. After a six-month stay with her sister in Crombach, a room became available in our “Hof” retirement home, where she quickly settled in and felt comfortable. Two years ago she moved to the nursing home on the first floor, where she finally passed away on Saturday evening. In the afternoon we were allowed to pray on her deathbed, where I gave her the anointing of the sick.

Anna was a woman who approached her life courageously and energetically and who always took her life independently and firmly into her own hands. We got to know her in the retirement home as a lovable person who always attached great importance to attending the services in our chapel.

Now she went on Saturday evening in peace - and safe in the belief that we were also kept in death by the God who said: Do not be afraid, I am with you. This belief also gave her the strength to accept impermanence from God's hand just as she accepted life - and loved to live.

There is a person from this earth who is also part of our life, who is dear and familiar to us in the almost 10 years here in the retirement home, she has been here in the home since June 2001 - and with her a person walks in his uniqueness, with his longing, with his experiences that only she has had; a person with his lovable and familiar sides and with his innermost secret that no one can fathom except God himself.
Anna has experienced the great upheavals of this century in the wide span of her life: born at a time when the 1st World War was raging, she experienced the 2nd World War, which also brought a lot of suffering to her family, happy and hard times, Letting go and farewell, most recently the death of her sister Lisa in January of this year.

It was given to her to take life positively. Now their life has culminated in the encounter with God, who tells us through Jesus Christ: "I want them to have life and have it in abundance." God has given us the gift of life in order to exchange it for something even greater: the fullness of life in communion with Him. The fiefdom on this earth is not something that one would like to wish for an eternal continuation; but it is also more than just a foretaste of the eternal. It is the material from which God will once complete our life when he adds the piece to the whole. What a person has given, hoped, loved and fought through will only come to full splendor in God's hands. "I give them eternal life," says Jesus, "they will never perish, and no one will snatch them from my hand."

Funeral service for Mr. Joseph Heck
Maria Schleck's spouse
Bütgenbach, April 5, 2011


Saying: "Your life was a big worry, was work, love and understanding, it was like a bright summer morning and then a quiet walking away from us."
prayer: Lord our God, the death of Joseph, filling loved ones and many of us with grief and pain, has brought us together here. JOSEPH's ordeal was difficult for those who accompanied him during this time. The question of why and our own helplessness depress us. In this hour, when we are forced to say goodbye to him, we come to you with all our open questions and our grief. And then this illness that made him, even more of you so helpless. And you had to watch the last few days how these lives had to end so quickly. Remember JOSEPH, whom you accepted as your brother in baptism and to whom you promised eternal life. Complete his life in your glory and be close to us with your comforting and healing power. We ask this of you through Jesus Christ.

Dear Mary, dear family of Joseph,

Who would have thought that we would meet here today to say goodbye to Joseph. Everything happened so fast. A fortnight ago he was still at work, which he loved to do. And then this insidious disease that brought his life to an end so quickly.
We are all very sorry for this and we mourn with you, dear family von Joseph.
We are here to let you feel that you are not alone in your suffering, in the pain of your farewell, and that we know we are connected to you in prayer.

“Like a strong tree, a grown oak with deep roots,” was Joseph, who loved to do his job so much. In the forest he felt at home to work in the forest. To be there for others, to make his strength available to others, that is how we have known him. “Dedication” for his family, for many others who knew about his manual skills. He couldn't say “no”, say “yes” when someone needed his help, that was Joseph. After retiring as a gendarme in St. Vith at the age of 56, he did not retire to old age. On the contrary.

On Friday morning death felled him like a tree. His hands were not just busy, but praying as well. It was a matter of course for him to attend the Sunday service.

Our deceased, to whom we are taking our final escort today, was a quiet, calm, peace-loving person. This is how you express it in the motto that you have chosen.

Not a man of great words, but of action; what he tackled, he also carried out.
He worried about his family; his five grandchildren were his everything.

It was a painful path that now lies behind Joseph and behind you, the relatives. The disease could not be medically brought under control. Once it was broken out and diagnosed, it spread inexorably. It could not be contained, let alone cured.

To suddenly have to let go of everything, to watch the decay of life - day after day - that hurts; it hurts to want to help but not be able to be condemned to swoon and helplessness.

Faithfully accompanied by you, dear relatives, he overcame the last difficult stretch of his life.

Death marks the end, but is it also the shooting point of his life? Does all life end in death? Does death have the last word on all our efforts and work, our worries and plans, our joys and fears, our hopes and doubts? If so, what is the point of our life?

As Christians we believe in a God who wants life from us and not death. When we look to Jesus Christ, we see that it is not death that has the last word, but God, who is the origin and goal of our lives. Christ overcame death for all of us. From the light of his resurrection a new light falls on our life, which now does not perish in death, but rises to true, perfect life; a life that knows no more death, no pain and no lament.

Joseph was rooted in Jesus Christ from his baptism. He was baptized into the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. For us this is reason to believe that thanks to his unity with Christ he has now reached the goal of his life; a goal that is not death but life, not destruction but resurrection.

So in the midst of all sorrow we want to let the hope of our faith speak by looking at the tree of the cross, which promises us life and salvation. May Joseph see God face to face through him who opened him and all of us through baptism: Jesus Christ, our Lord.

Wake
The Russian writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn describes in his book "In the Interest of the Cause" 1 the tenacious future will of a felled elm: "We saw wood, grabbed an elm beam and screamed. Since the trunk was felled last year, it had been off the tractor dragged and sawn into pieces, thrown onto tractors and trucks, rolled into stacks, thrown on the ground - but the elm beam had not surrendered! It had produced a fresh, green shoot - a whole future elm or a dense one, rustling branch. We had already placed the trunk on the trestle, like on an execution block; but we did not dare to cut its wood with a saw. How could it have been sawed? How much he wants to live - stronger than us! "

Dear relatives,
I have deliberately placed these sentences at the beginning of this address because I believe that the life of your father is expressed in this text. You yourself told me about his love for nature, for the forest. He often went into the forest. We are currently experiencing the first signs of spring outside in nature: fresh green on the bare trees, flower buds, sprouting seeds!

I think the poet has observed something very subtle for us here. Don't we recognize ourselves in the wooden beam, our will to live, our longing for a fulfilled future?

Before the death of a loved one, we often stand and think: Does death wait at the end of life - or does all suffering and life bear the germ of imperishable life?
The Christian faith picks up our questions with its message and answers them with the promise: We outlast death!

The God in whom we believe is not a God of the dead, but of the living.
Death does not take our life away from us. We confess this in worship when we say in prayer: "For your believers, O Lord, life will be changed, not taken away." Death does not take life away from us, it changes it from us. Here we have a core idea of Christianity, which ultimately tells us: Life is not meaningless.

Everything we have started and tried in our lives has not been in vain. May it be good deeds, good words or good thoughts, none of it was in vain or meaningless. All of this has become building blocks for our eternal house.

Man returns to the Lord through death, to the Lord, from whom he once started with a very specific life mission, but not with empty hands: He bears his lived life before God's face.

Tomorrow we will lower the body of Joseph into the earth. Life with us will go on. For a long time there will remain a pain in our hearts, the void that death has torn.

The grain of wheat must die. But from the death of the seed in the dark earth, new life grows to light.
We believe that with and for Joseph and that is why we will gather here tomorrow to say goodbye to him and to say “Adieu”, in German: to God.

Funeral service for Ms. Anita Kreitz-Schumacher
Spouse of Paul Kreitz
Bütgenbach, April 6, 2011

Song requests: CD Ave Maria (played by Mara and Marco / piano and trumpet), Air (Bach) and song by Sabine Cremer (love is like ...)
Closing text: Family
Saying: “Flowers symbolize the cycle of life. They are an expression of the living, the transience but also the return. "
Dead coffee: for the closest family and friends in Café Heinen

Prayers

Merciful God, we stand in sorrow at the coffin of our deceased. We look to her life with gratitude, to all that we have been able to experience from her in terms of kindness and love, help and support, joy and support. We are still under the impression of their suffering, their insidious disease. Medical art could relieve her suffering, she could not conquer the disease.
You, Lord, gave support to our deceased in her illness. She confided in you. Now accept them into your glory. Let them experience the happiness of being very close to you forever. Grant us, who are left behind, support and strength in our grief, be the rock of our heart in our suffering. We ask this through Christ our Lord.

God, the encounter with death brings us together here. We bear the grief together with the ANITA family. We do this from the faith that was part of their life. This belief has helped her and her loved ones overcome the many hardships of suffering and care, hopeful steps, and setbacks. But now we are looking for the strength to deal with loss and parting, with the finality of death, with the pain of grief. Raise our eyes so that we may recognize in the cross of your Son the love that was at work in the life of ANITA. Let her be safe in this love forever. We ask this through Christ our Lord.

God, it hit us deeply that ANITA died at the age of only 63, that the disease so quickly took away the strength to live. Her family had to let her go in pain and sadness. Today we put their lives in your hands. You alone can heal the pain that killed them. You alone can bring the dead to life. You alone are our hope that we will remain connected to ANITA through you and in you. You alone promise us that our common history with ANITA does not end today, but has a future with you. Strengthen us in this belief! We ask this through Jesus Christ, our risen brother and Lord.

  

Introduction:
None of us are here without an inner compassion. This is how close we are to saying goodbye to Anita, who was a good friend and fellow Christian in the parish or with the rural women.
We are very concerned: Not only because death took her away from us so early, but because we lost a woman who, in her fine, cordial nature, had a beneficial, valuable charisma. We can guess a little what it means for you to have lost your wife and your mother, your relatives.

The hospital stays, the chemotherapy, the loss of hair, the changed appearance ... she was spared nothing. First an ups and downs of hope and dejection, of confidence and resignation. The vital person standing in the middle of life became a person marked by serious illness, and soon also by death.

She is now redeemed, her severe cancer disease has stopped growing, her Good Friday is over. With death God says: "Now it is enough."
Letting go of ANITA now is difficult and very painful. We will all miss her, especially her family. Her premature death hurts and asks questions, preceded by the ruthless "why." Despite her untimely death, we are urged not only to mourn and ask probing why-questions. Rather, we are invited to look back gratefully on all the encounters with her.
Of course we all had hoped - for recovery and healing. After long and intense struggles against her serious illness, hope was painfully, even fatally, disappointed.

 

The tension we find ourselves in today on the day of the funeral is very difficult for us to endure. Many memories, thoughts and feelings fill us: grief and complaint, disappointment and bitterness, but also gratitude. The last stage was like a real way of the cross. ANITA was often like the disciples of Emmaus. She had to deal with disappointment over unsuccessful medical therapies. Like the disciples of Emmaus, ANITA had hoped again and again - but the hoped-for healing did not come about.
Like the two disciples from Emmaus, ANITA was not traveling alone. She did not have to take the difficult steps on her path of suffering alone and was able to experience important accompaniment on this last stage, especially from her family.

From the darkness of death we can now feel an Easter light, a life that grants her redemption and salvation. After all the terrible suffering, we want to give her this happiness now.
We are all still on the way to Emmaus. Let us therefore ask Christ to go with us as a companion, and we too call: Stay with us in our need. Lead us from the darkness of Jerusalem into the light to Emmaus, which stands for heaven, for happiness and Easter table fellowship, to where ANITA has arrived redeemed and liberated.

 

Canticle of the Sun of St. Francis of Assisi

Praise you, sir,
for brother fire,
by which you light up the night.
And he is beautiful and happy and happy and powerful and strong
Praise you, sir,
for our sister mother earth,
that sustains and guides us and produces diverse fruits,
with colorful flowers and herbs.
Praise you, sir,
for those who forgive for your love's sake
and endure sickness and adversity.
Blessed are those who endure in peace
for you, Most High, will one day crown them.
Praise you, sir,
for our brother, bodily death;
no living person can escape it.
Blessed are those he will find in your most holy will,
for the second death will do them no harm.
Praise and praise my Lord
and thank and serve him
with great humility.

Gospel: Mt 6.25-34
25Therefore I say to you, do not be anxious about your livelihood, about food, drink and clothing. Life is more than just eating and drinking, and people are more important than their clothes. 26 Look at the birds! They do not sow anything, they do not reap or collect supplies. Your Heavenly Father takes care of them. Don't you think he cares much more about you than about birds? 27And no matter how much you worry, there is nothing you can add to your height.
28Why are you so worried about your clothes? Look at the flowers in the meadows! They don't work and they don't care about their clothes. 29And yet, not even King Solomon in all his glory was dressed as splendidly as any of them.30If God even makes the meadow flowers grow so beautifully, which are blooming today and may already be withered tomorrow, don't you think that He will take care of you even more? Do you trust God so little?
So stop worrying about questions like, 'Will we have enough to eat? And what are we going to drink? What should we wear? ’32 Do you want to live like people who do not know God and struggle with all these things? Your Heavenly Father knows perfectly well that you need all of this. 33 Above all, worry about God's new world and live according to God's will. Then he will give you everything you need to live. So don't be afraid of the future! Tomorrow will bring its own questions and burdens and God will take care of you tomorrow too. "

Gospel II: The grain of wheat that falls into the earth (Jn 12: 24-25)
I assure you that a grain of wheat that does not go underground and dies cannot bear fruit, but remains for itself. In the earth, however, it germinates and bears a lot of fruit, although it itself dies in the process. 25 Whoever wants to hold onto his life for himself will lose his life. But if you let go of your life and use it for God, you will win real life forever.

 

Dear mourning family,

The abundance of life in spring can now be grasped with hands in nature: the growing and blooming, the flowers and colors. We stand at the coffin of a woman and mother who loved life. Her life is extinguished after an illness that has ruled her and your life for 1 ½ years. Death that destroys flourishing life and tears apart people who love each other. We cannot understand why a life ends like this.
Like every flower that Anita loved to have around her or to look at, life is a promise, a hope. Why doesn't life keep what it promises? Why does death seem stronger than life? Why is life so extinguished?

When saying goodbye to a person, it is important to feel for his soul, for what moved and shaken him, for what was particularly dear to him.
When she found out about her illness, she wondered, will I make it, will I conquer the disease. She had certain doubts about the disease. The treatment began, which became more and more of an ordeal: between uncertainty, despair, courage and hope it was a struggle for life. And in the end: could, she no longer wanted. New hope arose to try a new method from Switzerland. But even here you can't work miracles. Tired of the fight, it was finally a surrender to their last path on earth. Deep down she felt more and more: It will turn out badly, the disease will conquer me.

When she was not feeling well, she would go to her garden or go for a walk in nature, that gave her strength and afterwards she felt better again, as she herself said. She knew the Latin names of flowers and plants, did some research and read the specialist magazine. That was her great passion.

She had been a strong woman who always worried about the family. She always worked a lot, tackled life. She always did that at home, in her childhood and adolescence in agriculture.
She got involved, was active with the rural women, was happy when it came to cooking or baking. New recipes were tried.

The prayer with her husband Paul helped her: That is something important that you both - on June 12th you could both have been able to look back on 40 years of marriage - did to the end: to pray together, the Our Father, the Ave Maria. How much she would have loved to see our newly renovated church.

When we consider Anita's life, in the search for her soul we often find something essential in her passion, which was particularly valuable to her. That was probably her special affection for nature. That is why I have chosen the reading accordingly, an excerpt from the Canticle of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals, birds and nature.

Anita lived a close connection with the earth, with nature. The flowers, the garden, the birds, the animals ... That was their joy. She was so happy to listen to the birds singing that she even opened the window to do so, almost as if she were entering into a dialogue with them, with the birds of the sky, like St. Francis giving his sermon on the bird. If we sense what connects a person with nature in love, we can perceive something of his soul. Anita enjoyed all living things: sowing - according to the lunar calendar - she lived consciously, healthy - and seeing it grow.

Perhaps - I think to myself - something of the gospel we have heard is reflected in their lives: the faithful trust that God cares for us and for our lives, even more than for the flowers of the field and the birds of the sky; that in spite of all the worries in life, which were also evident in Anita's life, we can still feel that God is holding us in his hand.

Also in the future you will be Paul, you, the children and grandchildren will feel that the love she gave you and also the animals and plants, the love in which she knew she was connected to the great community of all living beings, will continue is alive. Because we humans are networked beings. There, where our love, where our attention, our tenderness flow, there is also a piece of our being, a piece of our soul that remains present. You also express that she finds her final resting place in her garden.

And when you hear the birds sing or see the bird feeder in the garden and the flowers in the garden, you will always be reminded of them.

Your soul is alive where relationships of trust and appreciation have grown, your life and soul are alive where your attention and love have already flowed during your lifetime.

Flowers will bloom at their final resting place in the garden. For Anita, we confess her immortality to the mortal that passes away. We believe in a new and eternal life with her and for her.

We know the role of flowers and blossoms in nature. Everyone wants to become a fruit one day. She sacrifices her beauty to awaken new life. Every flower is a sign of hope for a more far-reaching, even everlasting life. A hint of a beauty, because that lived in her, the love for beautiful things, for music, and the abundance of life that should never end. God has promised us this life.

Anita was closely connected with nature. She loved her garden and she knew the secret of life: a seed must fall into the dark earth and dissolve - only then can the fruit grow. The grain of wheat must die - an image for Christ - for his death - for his resurrection. After death in the Garden of the World, new, everlasting life blossomed.

The death of Anita makes us sad and sad. After long weeks of worrying and worrying, she died of the incurable disease on Saturday early in the morning.
This message can carry and lift us up in our sadness and dismay: After the darkness, light is now given to it - after death, life now blossoms. "If the grain of wheat does not fall into the ground and die, it remains alone, but if it dies, it bears abundant fruit."

The way of the wheat grain. So it has become bread, bread for us and our lives. The last stanza in the song of the wheat grain reads: "The Lord has chosen us as bread for many people, we live for one another, and only love counts."

All the best and all care, love and loyalty that she has given you in the family and other people is not lost. That lasts, that stays. What makes a person valuable in the memory of those around them also makes them valuable in the eyes of God. Everything that a person has done out of faith and love connects him with God. These are the flowers of life that don't wither. They bloom into eternity. Amen.

Funeral ceremony for Ms. Hubertine Küpper-Gross
Leo Küpper's widow
Elsenborn, April 07, 2011

 

Gospel II: The grain of wheat that falls into the earth (Jn 12: 24-25)
I assure you that a grain of wheat that does not go underground and dies cannot bear fruit, but remains for itself. But in the earth it sprouts and bears a lot of fruit, although it dies in the process. 25 Whoever wants to keep his life for himself will lose his life. But if you let go of your life and use it for God, you will win real life forever.

                                                                                               
Dear Hubertine family, dear fellow Christians,

Today we say goodbye to Hubertine, who in the night from Saturday to Sunday at the age of 79 years gave God back to her Creator life.

Her cradle was in Davens' house, where she was born in 1931 as the oldest of 5 children. Hubertine, whose husband Leo had died as a result of an accident at work in 1964, built her own house next to Davens in 1965 after she had previously lived with her children in Weywertz.

At the age of 33 she was a widow and had to cope with life alone with her three children. Thank God she tackled life, cleaning and sewing in many houses in order to provide for the family's livelihood.
Yes, she had to work hard, but was satisfied.

The abundance of life in spring can now be grasped with hands in nature: the growing and blooming, the flowers and colors. When we consider the life of Hubertine, in the search for her soul we often find something essential in what was valuable to her.

That was their connection with the earth, with nature. The flowers, the garden. That was her joy. We know the role of flowers and blossoms in nature. Everyone wants to become a fruit one day. She sacrifices her beauty to awaken new life. Every flower is a sign of hope for a more far-reaching, even everlasting life. A sense of the beauty and abundance of life that should never end. God has promised us this life.

She knew about the secret of life: a seed must fall into the dark earth and dissolve - only then can the fruit grow. The grain of wheat must die - an image for Christ - for his death - for his resurrection. After death in the Garden of the World, new, everlasting life blossomed.

Hubertine's death makes us sad. She was hospitalized in October last year and had only been home for 14 days since then. In the past 14 days, her health deteriorated and she passed away early on Sunday morning.

In mourning, this message can carry us and lift us up: After the darkness, light is now given to it - after death, life now blossoms. "If the grain of wheat does not fall into the ground and die, it remains alone, but if it dies, it bears abundant fruit."

The way of the wheat grain. So he became bread, bread for us and our lives. The last stanza in the song of the wheat grain reads: "The Lord has chosen us as bread for many people, we live for one another, and only love counts."

All the best and all the care, love and loyalty that she gave you in the family with the eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren who liked to come to her, also in the nursing home, where she was since January and where she revived, and other people, is not lost.

That lasts, that stays. What makes a person valuable in the memory of those around them also makes them valuable in the eyes of God. Everything that a person has done out of faith and love connects him with God. These are the flowers of life that don't wither. They bloom into eternity. Amen.

Resurrection office for Mrs. Maria Reinertz-Sarlette
Widow of Peter Reinertz
Weywertz, April 16, 2011


Saying: “Once every day comes to an end, every pain ends once. Father you hold my hands on the way to your home. "

Dear Maria family, dear fellow Christians,

Today we say goodbye to Maria Reinertz-Sarlette, who gave her life back to God the Creator on Wednesday at the age of 88.
Her cradle was in Weddem, where she was married 88 years ago, on January 24, 1923, as the second of five children. Jakob and Theresia Sarlette-Gilles was born. Her older brother Peter lost his young life in the Battle of Stalingrand in World War II.

Three years ago she came to the Weismes retirement home, where she was in good hands and felt good.
We know her as a quiet, reserved person who enjoyed working in the house and in the garden. On Wednesday afternoon I fell asleep peacefully.

A Jewish saying goes: “When a person is born, his hands are clenched as if to say:“ I will conquer the world. When someone dies, their hands are outstretched as if to say: I have nothing withheld, everything is yours, oh God. "

Getting older, getting old and dying also means: moving from holding on to letting go, having to give up. The deceased had to let go a long time ago, and, at least on the outside, you can't say: she was a good old age. Rather, getting old was for her a slow, but very intense, death in installments, and everyone who felt connected to her felt nothing as strong as their own powerlessness and helplessness.

“When a person is born, they clench their hands as if to say: I will conquer the world. When he dies his hands are outstretched. "

Outstretched hands say: I depend on others, I need help, I need someone to take my hand and tell me: I'll hold you tight, I'm with you, I'll guide you.

It is not only the old and the sick who have to learn that. Nobody can clench their hands all the time, nobody can just grab hold of a lifetime, everyone has to stretch out their hands at some point and say: I accept the limits of my strength, my ability; I am ready to entrust myself to someone who will take me by the hand and lift me up, who may lead me on paths that I cannot or do not trust myself to walk.

If you just clench your hands, you will be cramped and isolated. If you just want to hold on, you will never be able to give something, you can never receive anything new. Outstretched hands, according to Jewish tradition, also mean: "Everything is yours, O God."

We say goodbye to the deceased as people with very different relationships to the God in whose name we are gathered: some perhaps very firmly and securely, others with questions, even accusations and complaints against a God whose paths are not always closed understand, and still others will have come to the conviction that they can manage their life quite well without God. I mean, this difference draws attention to an important aspect of our faith: the faith that we profess here this morning is not something that can be taken for granted, nothing that imposes itself on us like an imperative. Belief in the resurrection is an offer, an invitation from God to us, not a compulsion, but a hand stretched out towards us: We can take hold of it, entrust our lives to him. We can say to him: Everything is yours, O God - my questions, my hope, my longing, my suffering, my faith, my life.

But as I said, this is an offer from God. If we stretch out our hand, then we do not reach into emptiness, and if we take his hand, God will tell us: You will not belong to death and to any other power, you will belong to me, you are my property. I take you by the hand and guide you. "So take my hands and guide me", so it says in a song, a bit cheesy and worn because it is so often used for weddings. But in reality it is a death song, because only God and no human can ultimately fulfill What is hoped for and expected: "So take my hands and lead me to my blissful end and for ever. I cannot walk alone, not one step. Where you will walk and stand, take me with you."

Funeral service for Ms. Martha Thomas-Niessen
Freddy Thomas' wife
Bütgenbach, May 17, 2011

 

Saying: “Your life has always been simple, you never thought of yourself. To strive only for your neighbor was your highest duty. "
reading: The good shepherd
1 [A psalm of David.] The Lord is my Shepherd, / I shall lack nothing.
2 He lets me lie down on green meadows / and leads me to the resting place by the water.
3 He satisfies my desires; / he guides me on the right path, true to his name.
4 Do I have to wander in a dark ravine too, / I fear no calamity; for you are with me, / your stick and your staff give me confidence.
5 You set the table for me / in front of my enemies' eyes. You anoint my head with oil / you fill my cup abundantly.
6 All my life I will be followed by pure kindness and grace / and I may live in the house of the Lord for a long time.

Dear Martha family, dear fellow Christians,

“Your life has always been simple, you never thought of yourself. To strive only for your neighbor was your highest duty. "

With this thought you describe the nature and life of Martha very appropriately.
On May 2nd our deceased came to the St. Vither Hospital, where her health deteriorated noticeably and where she gave her life back to God the Creator on Friday evening, shortly after 7 p.m.

Martha was born on September 5, 1930 in a large family as the 9th of 15 children of the married couple Johann and Maria Niessen-Limburg. She was strongly influenced by life in the large family to the end.

To be there for others and just not think about themselves, that was their life. Being there for others, for her husband Freddy, for the children, the three grandchildren, for whom she left everything and became a minor matter. The grandchildren were everything to her.
She was an unusually open person, sociable like no other, whether with children or adults, whom she met free, open-minded, interested and without prejudice. At school, one would speak of social competence that was literally inherited from her in the cradle.

She had a distinctly winning nature, uncomplicated, simple and sociable. She liked to have a lot of people around with whom she got into conversation very easily. She was not afraid of strangers. It was very easy to enter into a discussion with her about so many topics, which I have experienced several times myself.

Another characteristic of our deceased was their willingness to help: wherever she could help, she helped. Sewing was her passion and preferably for free.

We have also known her as a compassionate woman who was sensitive to the suffering of others. It affected her very much when other people, whether in the immediate vicinity or further away, experienced suffering or distress.

She complained little of her own pain, or at least did not show it openly. She bore her own pain patiently and always made sure that the others were okay.

On the last 4th Easter Sunday we celebrated the "Good Shepherd Sunday". The reading I have chosen speaks precisely of this good shepherd.
For you, Freddy, in the almost 52 years of marriage, for you, dear family and for so many others, Martha was like a good shepherd who was concerned with the well-being of the flock and did little to spare himself. It has left a lot of traces in our lives. "The only important thing in life is the trace of love that we leave behind when we go," said Albert Schweitzer. The love she gave you remains. You will continue to feel it, and it will connect you with you beyond death.

More than reason enough to thank God together for this life that he has given you, that he has given us, and that he is putting it back into his hands today.

Christ is the door to life for us, was the Gospel last Sunday. Whoever goes through it will be saved. Christ had a firm place in Martha's life; with him she went in and out. Now the gate, the door to heaven is open to her, where our goal is.

Lothar Klinges

introduction
Dear family, dear mourners,

It is certainly the hardest moment in a person's life to have to say goodbye to your wife and mother. It is with great pain that you feel that the intimate familiarity that existed between you has now broken off. And situations will certainly come to mind in which you love expressed itself in a special way, which are so speaking and at the same time so simple: How she cared for you, loved you and took part in your growing up and growing up.
A mother's HEART is limitless LOVE; This love never stops. - And in it she embodies - amazingly enough! - something of what God himself is.
We cannot imagine that a mother's HEART will ever stop beating ... nor will it ever stop beating for loved ones ... even beyond the death line ... a mother's heart of love keeps beating. ..

Resurrection office for Mr. Josef Reinertz
Spouse of Sidonie Schütz
Weywertz, May 21, 2011

 

Saying: “You no longer see the green garden in which you once so happily managed; Do not see your flowers bloom anymore, because death took all strength away from you. Now sleep in peace, rest gently and thank you very much for everything. "

Today we say goodbye to Josef Reinertz, who gave life back to God his Creator in the night from Tuesday to Wednesday, May 18th.

Josef was born on July 16, 1928 at “Klotisch” as the son of the married couple Josef Reinertz and Maria Masson. His mother died at the age of 42 after carrying her daughter to the grave just 14 days earlier at the age of only 19. Josef was seven years old when his mother died. A bad experience that had a huge impact on him. In January 1949 he was at the founding of the KFC and played in the founding team.

March 3rd, it was Old Women's Thursday, when there was exuberant cheerfulness everywhere, this day was for you, dear family, a day that you will not forget: the day on which Josef came to the hospital and on the same day Manfred came to the hospital in great distress was flown to the university clinic by rescue helicopter.

Difficult months lie behind you with ups and downs, with setbacks that always saddened Josef. He loved his family and was very worried about Manfred. “Manfred has to get well again,” he said so often and prayed for it. There was an intimate relationship between Manfred and him; they took an interest in each other's sickness.

Many of us have known Joseph as a lovable and peaceful person who always had a joke up his sleeve, knew how to entertain a whole group, and spread humor and joy. Even in the hospital he kept his sense of humor.
But he often spoke of his death that he would probably no longer see this or that. In the end his courage to face life was no longer there.

Josef was not supposed to see his home, which he left on March 3rd, during his lifetime, and he was so happy to be back on Monday. But things turned out differently: from St. Vith he was relocated to Liège. But unfortunately he could not be helped there either. He died as you told me, with a smile on his face.

In the last two years in particular, he has not been spared anything: several strokes of the brain and repeated hospital stays. But he still came home.

“You can no longer see the green garden in which you once so happily managed; You don't see your flowers bloom anymore, because death took all your strength away from you. Now sleep in peace, rest gently and thank you very much for everything. "

The flowers, the garden, the small animals were his passion. He liked to stay there, you met him there, did this job after retiring at the age of 58 at Steinbach, where he worked.