What does value system mean for you

Take the online value test now and find your values!

Values ​​and morals are the beliefs that we want to live by. They can guide us in difficult situations and help us to live full lives. When you are clear about your values, you can be less influenced and can avert situations that are harmful to you in hindsight.
Few things weigh heavier on you than guilt and shame. If you live by your values, you will feel less ashamed and guilty about your actions.
The only requirement for this is: You have to have defined your values ​​once. There are two ways to do this. You can do our value test online and find your values ​​very easily:

Find out my values ​​online

Or you can use our technique with pen and paper, these are the instructions:

You now need a DIN A4 piece of paper and a pen. Choose 12 values ​​from the following list that are important to you. Write them down one below the other. It's not about finding values ​​that you think would suit you. But values ​​that define and define you. Values ​​that make you feel warm in your stomach.

adventure
Mindfulness
acceptance
authenticity
balance
persistence
popularity
Humility
gratitude
discipline
Efficiency
honesty
empathy
development
success
fantasy
flexibility
freedom
Peacefulness
happiness
patience
serenity
justice
health
credibility
generosity
harmony
warmth
Helpfulness
humor
intuition
Willingness to compromise
Constructivity
creativity
Critical ability
ease
Passion
Willingness to learn
love
loyalty
compassion
courage
sustainability
Proximity
curiosity
openness
optimism
order
perfection
rationality
realism
respect
gentleness
Self-determination
sensitivity
security
solidarity
fun
spirituality
tolerance
tradition
transparency
loyalty
independence
responsibility
trust
wisdom
Knowledge
prosperity
Benevolence
Affiliation
reliability

This is the tricky part. Allow about 20 minutes to weigh each value against each other in your head. Start at the first value on your list. Is it more important to you than the second on your list? If so, you put a line at the first value. If the second value is more important to you, put a line there. Then you compare the first value with the third value. If the first is more important, if you make a line there, the third is more important then there. So compare the first value with all other 19 values.
Once you've done that, you start at the second value. You no longer have to compare it with the first value, you have already done that. So you now compare it with the third value. Then with the fourth and so on. Do this for all 20 values ​​on your list. The number of lines then shows you which values ​​are most important to you. Write down your top 3 below each other. Some values ​​probably have the same number of bars, which then share the space.

If you find it difficult to compare such abstract values ​​as spirituality and creativity, try to imagine concrete situations. So situations in which you have to choose between the values. For example: Imagine you had an hour more free time a day, would you rather pursue your spiritual discovery or a creative hobby?

Great, you have now defined your values. But are you really comfortable with them? Look again at the other values ​​that also got a high score. Is your fourth value better than your third value after all? Then swap them a bit until you feel really comfortable with your top 3.
Ask yourself if you are really proud of these values ​​and if you would share them with others and defend them in front of others. Now write it in large letters on a piece of paper or print it out in a beautiful font and hang it in your apartment.
If you like, you can also take this little test at your workplace with your colleagues. In this way you can set the values ​​of your team or your company and use them as a guide for every difficult decision. Even in partnerships, it is worth gold to know which values ​​are important to the other.

This technique comes from A good plan, the holistic appointment calendar for more mindfulness and self-love. Lots of reflections and techniques will help you get to know yourself better.

Jan Lenarz is the founder and managing director of Ein gute Plan. He is politically committed to mental health and writes about mindfulness, depression and burnout. Despite all his expertise in avoiding stress, he can relax best in the gym and nobody knows what went wrong. He is involved in the medical service of an aid organization and thus receives insights from the front of the pandemic.