Amphetamine increases the excitotoxicity of glutamate

Importance of the glutamate receptor subtypes for psychiatric diseases

Between Specialization and Integration - Perspectives in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy pp 10-15 | Cite as

Summary

Glutamate (GLU) is now considered to be the most widely used transmitter in the brain: GLU is the transmitter of cortical interneurons and probably of all corticofugal projections. GLU receptors (R) are mainly found in telencephalic areas: in the hippocampus, in the cortex, in the amygdala, in the septum nuclei and in the striatum. The ionotropic R, the AMPA-R and the NMDA-R, which has a binding site for glycine, are exciting, while the eight different types of metabotropic R are differently coupled to second messenger systems and can be localized both post- and presynaptically .

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